Charles V, Emperor, 1500-1558

Wie vnd in wellicher gestalt Kay. May. Võ[n] Bruck auß gen Lunden in Engeland gezogen ankõm[m]en vnd Empfangen worden ist

[Augsburg], [Melchior Ramminger], [1522]
A rare newsletter providing a day-to-day account of the visit of Charles V to London in June 1522, to confirm the recent alliance made between him and Henry VIII against Francis I of France.
Subjects
Festival books and prints - England, 1522
Printers/Publishers
Ramminger, Melchior, active 1520-1542
Other names
Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, 1500-1558
Thomas, à Becket, Saint, 1118?-1170

Charles v, Emperor
Ghent 1500 – 1558 Yuste (Spain)

Wie vnd in wellicher gestalt Kay. May. Võ[n] Bruck auß gen Lunden in Engeland gezogen ankõm[m]en vnd Empfangen worden ist.

[Augsburg, Melchior Ramminger, 1522]

quarto (188 × 135 mm), (4) ff. signed A4; not foliated or paginated. Woodcut compartment by Heinrich Vogtherr on title-page (180 × 128 mm), enclosing a profile portrait representing Charles v.1

paper watermark fleur-de-lis.

provenance Hartung & Hartung, Auktion 121: ‘Wert­volle Bücher’, Munich, 3 November 2008, lot 365

A lightly washed copy.

binding modern vellum-backed paper boards; back let­tered Karl V. Zug gen London.

A rare newsletter providing a day-to-day account of the visit of Charles v to London in June 1522, to confirm the recent alliance made between him and Henry viii against Francis i of France.2 It consists of daily entries, commenc­ing on 24 May with the gath­ering at Dunkirk of the Emperor’s entourage, its progress via Gravelines and Calais to Dover, where Henry viii was waiting, and thence to Canterbury, Sittingbourne, Rochester, Greenwich, and London (6 June).

The anonymous author, probably a herald accompa­nying the Emperor, focuses on the cavalcade into London, describing with many interesting details the preparation of the route (all the streets were covered with sand and certain houses draped with tapestries ‘as one has never seen the like’), the order of the participants, their costumes and jewellery; he pays less attention to the famous pageants which greeted Charles on his journey through London (just four­teen lines, again concentrating on dresses and jewels).3 Otherwise, his account is valuable for its descrip­tion (forty-two of a total of 174 lines) of the shrine and tomb of Saint Thomas Beckett in Canterbury, transcribing the epitaph thereon only a very short time before the tomb was demolished.4

These copies are known to the writer (none in North America)

● Augsburg, Staats- und Stadtbibliothek, 4 Gs Flugschr. 98 ● Berlin, Staatsbibliothek – Preußischer Kulturbe­sitz, Flugschr. 1522/7 ● London, British Library, C.33.e.3 ● Munich, Bayerische Staats­bibliothek, Res/Eur. 1021y; Res/4 Eur. 401,2; Res/4 Eur. 346,60 (three copies) ● Munich, Biblio­thek der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universi­tät, 0001/4 Hist. 213 ● Vienna5 ● Wolfen­büttel, Herzog August Bibliothek, A:188 Quod. (11)

Another edition, entitled Warhafftige newe Zeitung, wie vnd welcher Gestalt die Kay. May. von Bruck aus gen Lunden, also anonymously printed, is recorded by Weller (copy located in Stift Kloster­neuburg), but otherwise is unknown. The only account of Charles v ’s visit printed in England provides just the texts of poems written by William Lily for the pag­eants, omitting any account of the London entry on the ground that all had witnessed it.6

references Emil Weller, Die ersten Deutschen Zeitungen, herausgegeben mit einer Bibliographie 1505–1599 (Tübingen 1872), p.104 no. 57 (erroneously dated 1531); Verzeichnis der im deutschen Sprachbereich erschienenen Drucke des 16. Jahrhunderts (Stuttgart 1995), W–2611

1. Frank Muller, Heinrich Vogtherr l’Ancien: Un artiste entre Renaissance et Réforme (Wiesbaden 1997), p.170 no. 84. This compartment was employed by Ramminger in at least eight editions between 1521 and 1524 (present usage not cited by Muller).

2. For context, see Sydney Anglo, Spectacle, pageantry, and early Tudor policy (Oxford 1969), chapter five: ‘The Imperial alli­ance and the entry of the Emperor Charles v into London, June 1522’ (pp.170–206; p.190 for our newsletter).

3. The presence of the author in the imperial retinue is indicated by his description of the Emperor’s arrival in Dover (folio a2 recto), where he states ‘how they behaved to each other is not known to the servants of the court, since the court of the Emperor’s Majesty was at that time still at Calais’ (‘und wie sy sich gegen einander gehalten, ist dem hoffgesynd nit wissent gewesen, dann Kayserlich Mayestat hoffgesynd ist derselben zeit noch zu Kallysz geweszen’).

4. Reinhold Pauli, ‘An account of the visit of Charles v to England, by an eyewitness’ in Transactions of the Royal Society of Literature, second series, 7 (1863), pp.208–218; Jean Robertson, ‘L’entrée de Charles Quint à Londres en 1522’ in Fêtes et cérémonies au temps de Charles Quint, edited by Jean Jacquot (Paris 1960), pp.169–181 (our work cited p.181).

5. Both Weller and Pauli describe a copy ‘formerly preserved in the castle of Ambras in the Tyrol, at present in the Imperial Library at Vienna’, in which ‘the two rubrics are printed in red type’ (Pauli, op. cit., p.217). Our copy and the British Library copy are printed entirely in black.

6. stc 15606.7; see Charles Read Baskervill, ‘William Lily’s Verse for the Entry of Charles v into London’ in The Huntington Library Bulletin 9 (April 1936), pp.1–14 (our work cited p.7).

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